An Investigation of the Relationships Between Self-Handicapping And Depression, Anxiety, And Stress
 
Abstract
This study investigated the relationships between self-handicapping and depression, anxiety, and stress. The sample of study consists of 336 university students. In this study, the Self-handicapping Scale and the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS) were used. The relationships between self-handicapping and depression, anxiety, and stress were examined using correlation and structural equation modeling. Results demonstrated that self-handicapping positively related to depression, anxiety, and stress. The structural model fitted well to the data (χ2/df=1.18, p=0.317, GFI=1 .00, AGFI= .99, CFI=1.00, NFI=.96, IFI=1.00, RFI=.99, and RMSEA=.014) and also accounted for 17% of the depression, 24% of the anxiety, and 27% of the stress variances. According to path analysis results, depression, anxiety, and stress were predicted positively by self-handicapping.
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