Hidden Curriculum Contributing to Social Production-Reproduction in a Math Classroom

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Number of pages:
Year-Number: 2012-Volume 4, Issue 1

Abstract

Socialization or social reproduction is not adequate for the reproduction of society if it just occurs in the family. Therefore, schools are responsible for socialization or social reproduction. Curriculum makers ask about “knowledge is for whom” by meaning hidden curriculum. If knowledge is for some people, curricula need to educate productive people in society. This ethnographic study aims to address that in what extent social reproduction is created as an academic knowledge via hidden curriculum in math class, and what teacher does to transmit the social reproduction to the academic learning situations in classroom. The effectiveness of teacher factor on creating a productive classroom environment and social production are the lower dimensions of the problem statement. The study was conducted in the natural classroom environment of fourth-grade math in an elementary school in a small town located in the mid-west region of USA. The results of the study prove that curricular and extracurricular activities are mostly circled by the imposition of a cultural arbitrary. Besides, an elementary math classroom allows the students to be shaped by the culture and the disappearing social patterns more than expected.

Keywords

Abstract

Socialization or social reproduction is not adequate for the reproduction of society if it just occurs in the family. Therefore, schools are responsible for socialization or social reproduction. Curriculum makers ask about “knowledge is for whom” by meaning hidden curriculum. If knowledge is for some people, curricula need to educate productive people in society. This ethnographic study aims to address that in what extent social reproduction is created as an academic knowledge via hidden curriculum in math class, and what teacher does to transmit the social reproduction to the academic learning situations in classroom. The effectiveness of teacher factor on creating a productive classroom environment and social production are the lower dimensions of the problem statement. The study was conducted in the natural classroom environment of fourth-grade math in an elementary school in a small town located in the mid-west region of USA. The results of the study prove that curricular and extracurricular activities are mostly circled by the imposition of a cultural arbitrary. Besides, an elementary math classroom allows the students to be shaped by the culture and the disappearing social patterns more than expected.

Keywords